Darke APA-159 - History

Darke APA-159 - History


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Darke

A county in Ohio.

(APA-159: dp. 6,873; 1. 455'; b. 62'; dr. 24'; s. 17 k.;
cpl. 536; a. 1 6"; cl. Haskell)

Darke (APA-169) was launched 29 August 1944 by Oregon Shipbuilding Corp., Portland, Oreg., under a Maritime Commission contract; sponsored by Mrs. J. Hanson; transferred to the Navy 10 October 1944; and commissioned the same day, Captain McF. W. Wood in command.

Departing Port Hueneme, Calif., 4 December 1944, Darke joined in training in Hawaiian waters from 10 December to 27 January 1945, then sailed to Saipan I for rehearsal landings. On 16 February she cleared for Iwo Jima, landing men of the 5th Marines during the assault on 19 February. She lay off the bitterly contested island unloading cargo and receiving casualties until 25 February when she sailed for Saipan, arriving 5 March. She sailed to Espiritu Santo to embark Army troops, and carried them by way of Saipan to Ulithi, staging point for the invasion of Okinawa. Darke landed these men as reinforcements at Okinawa from 9 to 14 April, returning to Ulithi 23 April to replenish. Loading two new LCMs at Guam, she got underway for San Pedro Bay, Leyte, arriving 29 May for duty training Army troops until the end of the war.

From 27 August to 6 October 1945 Darke made two voyages carrying troops from San Pedro Bay to Japan for the occupation. Assigned to "Magic Carpet" duty returning servicemen eligible for discharge to the United States, she cleared Hiro, Honshu, 11 October, embarking passengers at Guam, Guadalcanal, and Noumea and arriving at San Francisco 18 November. From 30 November 1945 to 3 February 1946 she made two more voyages to bring home veterans from Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, and Kwajalein. On 10 February she got underway from San Francisco for the east coast, arriving at Norfolk 27 February. Darke was decommissioned 17 April 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal 22 April 1946.

Darke received two battle stars for World War 11 service.


The Higgins Boat: America’s First Amphibious Warfare Strategy

From the inception of amphibious warfare strategy and tactics, the Marine Corps sought the most efficient method of moving fighting men from ship to shore. Finding a proper landing craft that could reach the beach and discharge Marines swiftly sometimes seemed an insurmountable problem.

USS Darke (APA-159)’s LCVP 18, possibly with army troops as reinforcements at Okinawa, circa 9 to 14 April 1945.By US Navy. Image is in the public domain via Wikimedia.com

The solution lay with a hard-drinking Irishman from New Orleans, Louisiana, named Andrew Jackson Higgins. During the years before World War II, Higgins worked in the lumber business and then concentrated on the construction of small boats. Marketing all craft to hunters, trappers, and the oil industry. In the late 1930s, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps tested one of Higgins’ early designs, the Eureka Boat. Its performance was superior to a competing design that had originated with the Navy itself. Further tests took place during fleet landing exercises.

With the coming of World War II, Higgins was sure that the U.S. military would need small boats, and lots of them. He gambled with the purchase of the entire 1939 crop of mahogany from the Philippines and stored it for future use. Then insisting that the Navy “doesn’t know one damn thing about small boats!”

The Higgins Boat design that changed the war

The early Higgins boat design was modified to Navy specifications. It included the addition of a frontal ramp, which lowered to allow the troops aboard to exit rapidly. Boats were constructed of both wood and steel and measured 36ft 3in (11m) in length with a beam of 10ft 10in (3.3m). They were armed with a pair of .30-caliber machine guns and carried up to 8000lb (3629kg) of cargo, either infantrymen or equipment.

Higgins Boat (LCVP) plan. By Fred the Oyster. Image is in the public domain via Wikimedia.com

The Higgins Boat, officially designated the Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) by the military. The boat weighed 18,000lb (8165kg) and was capable of a top speed of 12 knots. The most common power-plants were a 225-horsepower Gray Marine diesel engine and a 250-horsepower Hall-Scott gasoline engine. Nearly 24,000 LCVPs, also popularly known as Higgins Boats, were produced by Higgins’ own firm in New Orleans. Although the coral reef at Tarawa laid bare the LCVP’s glaring weaknesses—its inability to traverse obstacles in the water or operate on land the little craft is remembered along with the Jeep, the C-47 aircraft, and the two-and-a-half ton truck as one of the transport systems that powered the Allied victory in World War II.

Michael E. Haskew is the editor of WWII History Magazine and the former editor of World War II Magazine . He is the author of a number of books, including THE MARINES IN WORLD WAR II. The Sniper at War and Order of Battle. Haskew is also the editor of The World War II Desk Reference with the Eisenhower Center for American Studies. He lives in Hixson, Tennessee.


Darke APA-159 - History

This site is intentionally kept simple to navigate and quick to load.

Specifications:

Displacement 6,873 t. (lt) 14,837 t (fl)

Complement 56 Officers 480 Enlisted

Troop Capacity 86 Officers 1,475 Enlisted

Cargo Capacity 150,000 cu. ft, 2,900 tons

Boats 2 LCM, 12 LCVP, 3 LCPU

Armament 1 5"/38 dual-purpose gun mount, 4 twin 40mm gun mounts, 10 single 20mm gun mounts

Propulsion 1 Westinghouse geared turbine, 2 Combustion Engineering header-type boilers, single propeller,

Design shaft horsepower 8,500.

Darke (APA-159) was launched 29 August 1944 by Oregon Shipbuilding Corp., Portland, Oreg., under a Maritime Commission contract sponsored by Mrs. J. Hanson transferred to the Navy 10 October 1944 and commissioned the same day, Captain McF. W. Wood in command.

Departing Port Hueneme, Calif., 4 December 1944, Darke joined in training in Hawaiian waters from 10 December to 27 January 1945, then sailed to Saipan for rehearsal landings. On 16 February she cleared for Iwo Jima, landing men of the 5th Marines during the assault on 19 February. She lay off the bitterly contested island unloading cargo and receiving casualties until 25 February when she sailed for Saipan, arriving 5 March. She sailed to Espiritu Santo to embark Army troops, and carried them by way of Saipan to Ulithi, staging point for the invasion of Okinawa. Darke landed these men as reinforcements at Okinawa from 9 to 14 April, returning to Ulithi 23 April to replenish. Loading two new LCMs at Guam, she got underway for San Pedro Bay, Leyte, arriving 29 May for duty training Army troops until the end of the war.

From 27 August to 6 October 1945 Darke made two voyages carrying troops from San Pedro Bay to Japan for the occupation. Assigned to "Magic Carpet" duty returning servicemen eligible for discharge to the United States, she cleared Hiro, Honshu, 11 October, embarking passengers at Guam, Guadalcanal, and Noumea and arriving at San Francisco 18 November. From 30 November 1945 to 3 February 1946 she made two more voyages to bring home veterans from Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, and Kwajalein. On 10 February she got underway from San Francisco for the east coast, arriving at Norfolk 27 February. Darke was decommissioned 17 April 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal 22 April 1946.


Airborne Assault On D-Day

Posted On February 04, 2020 17:23:59

June 6th, 1944…D-Day. It was the greatest military assault ever staged. Code named Operation Overlord, the massive invasion of Normandy by the Allies involved more than a quarter of a million soldiers, sailors and airmen as well as 5000 ships and 3000 aircraft.

Tom McCarthy and Francis Lamoureux were Parachute Infantrymen during the epic conflict. They tell their riveting first-hand accounts in this dramatic presentation, Airborne Assault on D-Day.

Asperiores odit

Darke APA-159 - History

Resources for Darke Co. Researcher Networking DCO BOOKSTORE. Visitors can find other titles with relationships to Darke Co. History and Genealogy for sale by private parties. If you have something for sale about Darke County, submit it to Jane Torres for this page.

    Annual Celebration of the DCO Discussion List held in Greenville
      Albums of photographs taken of participants in ListFests.
    • ListFest 2000 Article [long load] Front page article in Greenville Advocate about the ListFest 2000 held 22 July 2000. (JPEG image)

    The Genealogy Room at the Garst Museum is your 'best bet' to begin a documents search in Darke Co. All of the early Court House records have been microfilmed and they are available in the Genealogy Room. What can't be found there, staff can direct you to at other locations in the county. US Mail inquiries regarding documents and their costs & availability should be directed to Phyllis Crick / c/o Garst Museum / 205 N Broadway / Greenville, OH 45331-2222 . Always included SASE for her reply. No research is done by Staff at the Probate Court or Court House. No genealogical questions will be answered on the phone to the Museum.
    see also: Darke Co. Genealogical Society where it is explained that a $2 donation to the Society gets a survey of what is available for a specific surname request and cost of copying/mailing. Research by Genealogy Room Staff is $10/hour plus copying and mailing costs.
    [Microfilmed Records are also available at Wright State University in Dayton, OH (about 40 miles away). See their site for costs and access. E-mail inquiries to WSU Library Staff.]

    Darke Co. Probate Court
    300 Garst Ave
    Greenville, OH 45331
    937-547-7345
    Garst Museum
    205 N Broadway
    Greenville, OH45331
    937-548-5250
    Birth & Death records from 1867 to 1908, Marriage Records and Probate Records from 1817 are held by the Probate Court.
    (also on microfilm at Garst Museum) Early Wills, Estates, Probates (dockets #1-#5818) are handled at the Garst Museum Darke Co. Genealogical Society and Historical Society files are at the Garst Museum
    205 N Broadway / Greenville, OH 45331
    Darke Co. Health Dept
    300 Garst Ave
    Greenville, OH 45331
    937-548-4196
    Greenville Public Library
    520 Sycamore St
    Greenville, OH 45331
    937-548-3915

    Migrations to and from Darke Co.

    Click SEARCH button below to access information at another site concerning those migrating to and from Darke Co., OH. If you wish to submit new data yourself, click SUBMIT button and follow directions. There is no link -back- to this Darke Co. Genealogy page at the other sites so use your BACK key as many times as necessary to return to this page.

    To search for SURNAMES in the Migrations database, use this link: http://www.migrations.org/surname.php3

      Neighboring county links.
    • MAP of OHIO Requires Adobe's Acrobat Reader. Use ZOOM to view counties, townships, and major cities. for Darke Co.
    • Ohio Deaths Index 1913-1937.
    • Ohio Newspapers Newspaper Index 1793-1996.
    • OHGenWeb's OHGenWeb Project
        Defunct/changed place names, cemeteries, towns, townships, etc. for Ohio.
        Queries for Ohio where the specific county is unknown to the poster. Post general Ohio queries here!! Program designed to find others who will do research for you in exchange for research you do where you live.
    • Links to sites that are not part of the USGenWeb Project are provided for your convenience and do not imply any endorsement of the sites or their contents by the USGenWeb Project or its members. Neither the USGenWeb Project nor its members are responsible for the contents of any "third party" site which you may access from a link on this page.


      Darke APA-159 - History

      Late 1700's Frontier Forts of Anthony Wayne

      After the resounding defeat of generals, Harmar and St. Clair, President George Washington sent General Anthony Wayne to the Ohio Territory to settle the violence that was preventing further westward settlement. Washington respected Wayne's military abilities. "Anthony Wayne was a prudent and careful officer. He was a systematic organizer who paid careful attention to basic military problems such as supply, training, and the comfort of his men in the field. He never undertook an operation without thorough advance planning and minute attention to detail. Wayne took care to learn from the mistakes and successes of his predecessors." Nelson, Paul David, Anthony Wayne: Soldier of the Early Republic. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 1985.

      ​It was Wayne's plan to build small forts between Fort Washington (now Cincinnati) and wherever the new permanent fort would be located. Wayne would use these forts to protect and re-supply his legion. Starting from Pittsburgh, Wayne's first fort was some 22 miles down- stream. Built in October 1792, it was named Legionville. There, his troops had a safe and healthy place to train and prepare for the next step north.

      ​Arriving at Fort Washington in May, 1793, Wayne thought the village was unhealthy and would not be a safe place to continue training his troops. He moved one mile farther down the river and built Hobson's Choice. They left the area on October 7, 1793

      ​Wayne continued north toward Fort Hamilton, the first station on the line of forts from the Ohio River to Fort Jefferson. From Fort Hamilton, they preceded on to Fort St. Clair and then Fort Jefferson. Using Ft. Jefferson as a supply depot, Wayne found a high ground overlooking a vast prairie approximately 8 miles north of Ft. Jefferson. In November, 1793, he began the construction of a permanent military installation. He named it Greene Ville. It was 55 acres with strong bastions with some 300 log huts for his men. It was an unassailable post. Ft. Greene Ville was never attacked.

      December 29, 1793, the army reached the site of General St. Clair's defeat. They built a small fort in just a few days. They called it Fort Recovery because they recovered the bones of St. Clair's slain army (some 900 individuals). They also recovered three cannons from the river.

      ​On July 28, 1794, Wayne started north again and left Greene Ville, past Ft. Recovery. They forged into the wilderness at the end of the prepared road through "thickets, morasses, marshes defiles and beads of nettles more than waist high and miles in length". Near the St. Mary's River he built Ft. Adams on August 1, 1794.

      Fort St. Mary's was built in August 1794 as a supply fort prior to the Battle of Fallen Timbers.

      Fort Defiance was also built in 1794. It was built as a stronghold to command the confluence of the Auglaize and Maumee Rivers.

      Fort Deposit was built in 1794 within ten miles of the British stronghold of Ft. Miami and used to deposit the military stores and equipment and stores not used in the battle of Fallen Timbers.

      Fort Industry was built in 1794 as a supply depot on the left bank of the Maumee River at Swan Creek (later Toledo, Ohio).

      In 1794, Wayne completed Fort Wayne at the confluence of the St. Joseph, St. Mary's and Maumee Rivers.

      Fort Rowdy , close to present day Covington, Ohio, was a small stockade built at the portage around Greene Ville falls to protect men, equipment and supplies for transport up Greenville Creek from the Stillwater River.

      Fort Loramie was a supply fort on the site of the old trading post occupied by Peter Loramie.

      Fort Briar the location for bullock pens used for the slaughter of cattle for meat for all the forts under Wayne's command. This camp was built on the banks of the Stillwater river in Richland Township, in Darke County, Ohio.

      ​Note: Visit "Relics of Greene Ville's Past" for more information about Ft. Greene Ville


      Peter Everest Air Force Test Pilot

      Posted On February 04, 2020 17:24:02

      General Frank “Pete” Everest was a record-setting U.S. Air Force Test pilot. As a fighter pilot in World War II he flew over 150 combat missions. He then went on to lead the Air Force flight test program, flying with other legendary pilots like Chuck Yeager and George Welch.

      From 1950 to 1956 he flew an average of eight newly designed aircraft a month, setting records like taking the Bell X-1 to an altitude of 73,000 feet and the X-2 to a speed of over 1900 miles per hour, making him the “fastest man alive” at the time. In this episode Pete Everest tells stories of those pioneering days of experimental aircraft and daring test pilots.

      Asperiores odit

      Where and How to Get Darke County Divorce Records

      Divorce records are processed at the Clerk of Courts’ office in Darke County. Residents requesting these records would be expected to include details such as the petition date, the record file number, and the spouses’ names. Completed requests should be sent to:

      Darke County, Ohio Clerk of Courts
      Darke County Courthouse, 2nd Floor
      504 South Broadway, Suite 10
      Greenville, OH 45331
      Phone: (937) 547-7335


      Darke County OH Cemetery Records

      NOTE: Additional records that apply to Darke County are also on the Ohio Cemetery Records page.

      Note: Burial locations are often listed in death records and obituaries.

      Darke County Cemetery Records

      Abbottsville Cemetery Records

      Adams in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Metz/Tittle Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

      Ansonia Cemetery Records

      Ansonia Cemetery Billion Graves

      Arcanum Cemetery Records

      Arcanum Greenlawn Cemetery Billion Graves

      Ithaca Cemetery Billion Graves

      Ithaca Lutheran Cemetery Billion Graves

      Newcomers Cemetery Billion Graves

      Old Abbottsville Cemetery Billion Graves

      Beamsville Cemetery Records

      Bradford Cemetery Records

      Bradford Cemetery Billion Graves

      Greenville Creek Cemetery Billion Graves

      Brown Cemetery Records

      Burkettsville Cemetery Records

      Castine Cemetery Records

      Clark in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Coletown Cemetery Records

      Fort Jefferson Cemetery Records

      Franklin in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Gettysburg Cemetery Records

      Gordon Cemetery Records

      Greenville Cemetery Records

      Beech Grove Cemetery Billion Graves

      County Home Cemetery Billion Graves

      Creekbaum Cemetery Billion Graves

      Dininger Cemetery Billion Graves

      East Zion Cemetery Billion Graves

      Greenville Cemetery Billion Graves

      Nashville Cemetery Billion Graves

      New Greenville Cemetery Billion Graves

      Oak Grove Cemetery Billion Graves

      Palestine Cemetery Billion Graves

      Sharpeye Cemetery Billion Graves

      West Branch Cemetery Billion Graves

      West Zion Cemetery Billion Graves

      Harrison in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Hill Grove Cemetery Records

      Hollansburg Cemetery Records

      Hollansburg Cemetery Billion Graves

      Ithaca Cemetery Records

      Liberty in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Bass Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

      Clemens Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

      Long Cemetery Records

      Mississinawa Cemetery Records

      Neave Cemetery Records

      New Madison Cemetery Records

      Clark Cemetery Billion Graves

      First Universalist Cemetery Billion Graves

      Greenmound Cemetery Billion Graves

      Otterbein Cemetery Billion Graves

      Wilt Cemetery Billion Graves

      New Weston Cemetery Records

      North Star Cemetery Records

      Osgood Cemetery Records

      Painter Creek Cemetery Records

      Palestine Cemetery Records

      Pitsburg Cemetery Records

      Richland in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Rossburg Cemetery Records

      Sharpeye Cemetery Records

      Union City Cemetery Records

      Hillgrove Cemetery Billion Graves

      Snell Cemetery Billion Graves

      Versailles Cemetery Records

      Brock Cemetery Billion Graves

      Brock Cemetery Billion Graves

      Frenchtown Cemetery Billion Graves

      Greenlawn Cemetery Billion Graves

      Saint Valbert Cemetery Billion Graves

      Washington in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Trinity Lutheran Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

      Webster in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Woodington Cemetery Records

      Yankeetown in Darke County Cemetery Records

      Yorkshire Cemetery Records

      Mendenhall Cemetery Billion Graves

      Saint Martin Cemetery Billion Graves

      How to Use This Site Video

      Ohio Map

      Darke County shown in red

      Research Tip

      Cemetery records may include images or transcriptions of tombstones, or other burial records kept by the cemetery. Cemetery records typically list a person's name and birth and death dates. Some people buried in a cemetery may not have a current tombstone marker.


      References

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      This is a giant online mental map that serves as a basis for concept diagrams. It's free to use and each article or document can be downloaded. It's a tool, resource or reference for study, research, education, learning or teaching, that can be used by teachers, educators, pupils or students for the academic world: for school, primary, secondary, high school, middle, technical degree, college, university, undergraduate, master's or doctoral degrees for papers, reports, projects, ideas, documentation, surveys, summaries, or thesis. Here is the definition, explanation, description, or the meaning of each significant on which you need information, and a list of their associated concepts as a glossary. Available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Polish, Dutch, Russian, Arabic, Hindi, Swedish, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Catalan, Czech, Hebrew, Danish, Finnish, Indonesian, Norwegian, Romanian, Turkish, Vietnamese, Korean, Thai, Greek, Bulgarian, Croatian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Filipino, Latvian, Estonian and Slovenian. More languages soon.

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      Watch the video: Karl V. und Sir Francis Drake Große Leute in der Geschichte


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